Monday, April 18, 2016

the balloon in the room


Here's a not so well kept secret. I don't like balloons.  It doesn't matter if they are made from rubber or mylar, long or short, tied up into some supercool shape, or so round and over inflated that they are as transparent as my displeasure with them.  No matter how vibrantly colored or happy the message printed on them, balloons for me are the bringer of cartoon scribble cloud storms on an otherwise happy go lucky day. 

It's the anticipation and the unpleasantries of the pop that make me cringe enough to say or do something outside my normal laissez faire existence.   I am that person who is lucky enough to be married to that big boyfriend who will fetch earplugs from the car so we can eat in peace amidst the minefield mix of  Red Robin burgers, balloons, careless children, and hot overhead lights.  I am that person who made Little Madwilly and her brother Takato leave their free helium filled balloon scores behind at the grocery store, lest they become the featured story on the six o'clock news, abandoned as they would have been right there in the parking lot.  When balloons are in the room, I like to do something about it.  I must do something about it.

When tiny chumley first exhibited signs of IVDD, I approached his condition pretty much the same as I do with balloons in the room, only perhaps with an understandably larger dose of worry and urgency. No, I did not put him in the trunk like I did with my nephew's clown-tied balloon sword, nor would I ever even consider threatening him with abandonment in a parking lot.  But much like the problem of having a balloon in the room, I wanted the problem resolved. I wanted him better, fixed forever.   But alas it's not like that for little wolves born with unusually long spines and gnarled short legs. Despite the measures we take to minimize risk, flare ups can and will occasionally happen.

Careful everyday handling, conservative medical management, and quiet time to heal have thus far kept Baxter's balloon from popping, but when the yelps came back on Sunday with mild symptoms slightly different than those we usually see with neck flare ups, it was time to push the reset button and understand if a new balloon had entered the room.


Long story short, there isn't an clear answer yet, which in many ways is a better sign than if it were. After a visit to the emergency vet on Sunday where tiny chumley sat quietly for hours in his little red bun crate and never once yelped under examination, and a barkier visit today with Baxter's regular mobile vet, still with no yelping but with noted concern at how his hind legs were positioning themselves when he walked and turned, we are waiting to see what more there is to see.  Unless things take a severe turn, surgery is not imminent or overtly indicated. A day must pass to let the woozy side effects of gabapentin run through his system.  Another video must be made of him doing the hind leg knuckle test, and walking, turning to the left and right to see what his little hiney legs are up to. And then we go from there.

Aside from their actual passing, I can think of nothing more troubling to little wolf ownership than when our little ones are medically compromised.   But it's a balloon in the room that I will gladly endure, time and time again.




14 comments:

Anonymous said...

Baxter,
I'm so sorry to read about this non wolf like turn of events. Your sweet spirit and happy go lucky antics have brought me and mine much joy over the years. Please know you are being thought of and prayed for. Little wolves are tough creatures, B. You can beat this.
Much love,
Shug & Bluebies Mom, Elizabeth

Melissa Bridgeman said...

Baxter stay strong you ARE a brave wolf, BRAVER and SMARTER than any dumb Ole wolf in the wild - for you have managed to BE a WOLF in a human home where the HUMANS cook for you, let you dig, capture wild game, protect you from girl cooties, for a wild wolf fears a human - whereas YOU have them eating from your paw. Get better soon.

Melissa Bridgeman said...

Baxter stay strong you ARE a brave wolf, BRAVER and SMARTER than any dumb Ole wolf in the wild - for you have managed to BE a WOLF in a human home where the HUMANS cook for you, let you dig, capture wild game, protect you from girl cooties, for a wild wolf fears a human - whereas YOU have them eating from your paw. Get better soon.

Jane said...

Oh Baxter! I wonder what is wrong? I do hope it is something minor that rest and meds will take care of. But I do know that your parents will know what is best. Praying that surgery won't be needed. I think that all Dachshund owners have the worry of IVDD striking at any time. Sambo and I hope you are feeling your little wolf self very very soon! 😊

April Martin said...

Stay strong Baxter and use that Wolf Courage we all know you have!

Nat said...

Baxter, you've got this buddy. There's nothing a brave wolf like you can't conquer. Let alone four letters starting with I and ending in D. We love you Baxter.

Elizabeth said...

Sending positive healing thoughts your way, B!

Jasper + Amy said...

Oh Baxter, this brought tears to my eyes. Jasper & I are sending lots of love and healing thoughts to you, dear friend. ❤❤❤

Jasper + Amy said...

Oh Baxter, this brought tears to my eyes. Jasper & I are sending lots of love and healing thoughts to you, dear friend. ❤❤❤

Meagan Vaughn said...

You got this little B. Oscar and Bailey are sending you love and healing foofies :) Let your mom take good care of you.

Anonymous said...

Chin up little B. I'm sure all will end well. Wally had an issue with his rear quarters awhile back after he got a little too enthusiastic trying to get a snackie he wasn't entitled to. The DR treated it fairly aggressively with prednisone. Even though Mr. Wally was quite out of it for about a week, when everything was done he was back to his hopping old self. A little while later I noticed that he was acting a bit strange when he was walking so I rushed him back to the DR. They took x-rays and then ushered me into the exam room to show me what they found - the biggest poopy snake ever! Apparently it was causing him quite a lot of discomfort. And so, as we were at the reception counter waiting to pay his $400 constipation discovery bill, he had a poop on the reception floor! After that I switched him to wet food and life for the little mister has been smooth sailing.... Wally & B are sending healing thoughts your way as well!

Anonymous said...

Oh Baxter I hate this. I always worry about IVDD When Penny chases a rabbit. All Doxie moms do. Are you on R&R, meds and love. I know you're in the best of hands. Keep us posted. All thoughts coming your way. Love you Mr. B.
Marene&Penny

Anonymous said...

Oh, little Baxter, we are thinking of you and hope you get better very soon. The first dachshund in my life (when I was a little girl) had one episode of severe back problems at about age 7. It left him dragging his back legs, which had no feeling. With visits to the vet, very loving care from my parents and losing about 2 pounds, Trailer Longfellow regained the full use and feeling in his back legs. Thereafter cold Wisconsin winters were tough for him, but he was a very happy little guy and lived many more years.

Little Klaus' Mom

Anonymous said...

I'm so sorry to hear about Baxter. I read here every day and many times it is the highlight! I, too, do not like balloons and I have the same feelings you do. All these years I thought I was crazy so you can imagine how grateful I was to read this post! I just lost my beautiful dachshund, Wishy, in November to IVDD. It was hard to let her go. Her little yelps of pain were worse than a thousand balloon pops to me.

I wish Baxter the fastest of recoveries. I know that you are doing all you can for him. Crate rest is the best and if you can keep him quiet, he will heal. Unfortunately, they don't always want to be still! Just know that he loves you, no matter what.

Thank you for sharing your story with us readers. Baxter is the best!

Dawn
xoxo